About your Search

20130201
20130209
STATION
FOXNEWS 47
MSNBCW 19
CSPAN 18
MSNBC 18
CNNW 14
CNN 13
CSPAN2 9
FBC 7
KQED (PBS) 5
KRCB (PBS) 5
WHUT (Howard University Television) 5
WRC (NBC) 5
WTTG 5
WETA 4
KTVU (FOX) 3
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 245
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 247 (some duplicates have been removed)
with our immigration system. that technology world sees that people have gotten their phd from schools like mit. if you are a farmer, you would say that the migrant farmers do not have their papers. if you are checking crowdabs in maryland, the season be destroyed because you do not have workers. below thing is a mess. i have hope that -- the whole thing is a mess. >> you represent a lot of companies in silicon valley. what are you hearing from them? what is the solution to these problems? >> at it not so much a h-1 visa problem. i'm not saying it should be repealed, but it has structural problems. the real answer is residents. if you have some hot shot that got his phd in computer science from stanford, he's getting offers from all over the world. if you make them stay in limbo for six years, that's not really competitive. we want people to stay here and create jobs. that does not just in the tech field, but throughout the economy. make it easy for people to stay and grow american jobs to help our economy recover. >> what is the atmosphere for potential immigration reform in congress? >> w
technology including artificial organs, a synthetic blood, and robotic lynn's -- limbs. >> at first glance, you might mistake him for a person, but rex's body is more like a computer. >> i thought that was absolutely science fiction, so i thought it was very impressive. also the fact they are very close to end implantable artificial kidney that will be able to replace a failing kidney -- >> he has a pathetic form and had, so he is familiar with the challenges prosthetics users face. >> it is difficult to be told not only is this technology not ready yet, but when it becomes available, it will be so expensive that it will be completely out of the question. >> rex is not cheap, but he showcases what is possible with modern technology and creates hope for amputees around the world. >> that makes the $6 million man sound like a bargain. >> and that will be getting cheaper as technology gets less expensive, so we will be keeping an eye on that. thanks for joining us. >> for more, visit our website at dw.de. >> bye bye. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
-jostling sensurround! [ laughter ] a lot of technology. [ laughter ] nation, for years i've been warning you about iran. they're almost as big a threat as our other enemy ee-rahn. frightening. also, freetening. [ laughter ] but now there's an even bigger reason to be afraid. >> iran has just launched a monkey into space, lauding it is an advance in missile and space program that alarmed the west and israel. >> how did they launch a monkey into space? [ laughter ] >> stephen: excellent question, gretchen. how did they launch a monkey into space? [ laughter ] the possibilities are endless. [ laughter ] did they use a giant slingshot? or a monkey sized t-shirt cannon? [ laughter ] or did they do the obvious: put yellow-tinted glasses on a monkey and wait until a crescent moon so it thinks it's a banana and climbs up there himself? [ laughter ] how did they do it?! >> they've got rockets over there. [ laughter ] >> stephen: huh. they've got rockets over there. i did not see that coming. [ laughter ] folks, all this time we've been worrying about enriched uranium-- iran has been acquiring weapons of macaque
reference in there, diesel technology. diesel is make a comeback. you get 30% more mileage. for example, this car can go around $600 mile per fill-up. so it makes a great road trip car. and diesel vehicles are typically, you have more power than their gasoline variants. but nowadays, they are much cleaner than they used to be and in fact, california where they have the strictest emission laws, just certified clean diesel vehicles. >> and talk about some of the technology on the inside of that car. >> one of the thins that will be highlighted is just user friendly technology interfaces and telematics. audi has what they call mmi which comingles their navigation and all their interfaces. it has wi-fi and you can connect a cadre of different devices. that is good for the kids. my daughter is studying for a spelling bea and my daughter can be on her ipad online. >> this is a nice porsche. >> this is a cayan suv. this represents over 50% of their sales. this is coming there a manufacturer that previously only made sports cars. but they have many variants of this car. butt diesel version, the
, and increasing l tempo is the role that technology played. i mean, obviously we have seen the development of syndromes, we have seen the application of super computers. one of the things you did is move the intelligence analysts tout to the base there. and integrated everything upfront. can you talk about that a little bit the role that technology played. >> yeah. there's several things in technology that changed the fight. one is obvious it was predators. it wasn't drone strikes. it was drone surveillance. because you put a surveillance that gives you full motion video, anywhere if our force to include the guys on the ground could watch what the predator is watching in real-time video. the real effect of that is several. one, it used to take 120 people to raid a target when only twenty were going inside. it takes 100 to secure it outside make sure you don't get people reinforcing or whatnot. if you can do it from the air you only send twenty. now, the other hundred can hit five other targets. we could hit six targets in the time we're hitting one. and you know more. you can put drones ov
claim north korea used bann enn missile technology. >>> right now, vice president joe biden is meeting with leaders in germany. earlier this morning, he talked about iran's nuclear ambitions at a security conference in munich. he says there's still room for diplomacy if iran is willing to make a good faith effort. >>> today marks one year since the murder of a transgender woman in northeast d.c. mayor vincent gray will be among those attending a vigil today at the bus stop where she was murdered. jones was waiting for a bus at the intersecti-- when she was s the face. she later died from her injuries. >>> a maryland community is coming together to help a family who lost two of their daughters in a massive house fire. the fire broke out late thursday night on highland avenue in frederick county. 3-year-old sophie and 6-year-old madigan died of smoke inhalation. four members of the family survived. neighbors describe the chaos as they saw the house go up in flames. >> she wasn't screaming like words. it was just like a painful scream. >> absolutely devastated. a mother's worst nightmare.
that change and increasing the tempo is the role that technology played. i mean, obviously, we've seen the development of drones, we've seen the application of supercomputers. of one of the things that you did was move intelligence analysts out into balad, into your base there integrating everything up front. can you talk about that a little bit, the role that technology played? >> yeah. there are several things of technology that changed the fight. one is obvious, it was of predators. it wasn't drone strikes, it was drone surveillance. because you put a surveillance that give cans you full motion video means that anywhere on our force to include the guys on the ground could watch what the predator's watching in full-time video or realtime video. the real effect of that is several. one is where it used to take let's say 120 people to raid a target when only 20 were going inside, it takes 100 to secure it outside to make sure you don't get people reinforcing, what not. if you can do it from the air, you only send 20. now, the other hundred can hit five other targets. so we could hit six
that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, or my record. my overall world view has never changed: that america has and must mainta
. >> emerging technologies are changing the ways that we get our entertainment, but not for everyone. 40 years since television was transmitted in color, new figures show the 20,000 homes still enjoy their programs in black and white. not so bad, is it? part of our ongoing series of not so obsolete technologies around the world. >> the main issues in europe today -- >> do not adjust your television, do not worry, there is nothing wrong. john thompson just prefers television in black and white. >> it somehow has more importance to it, it seems less trivial as there are more and more channels, to sit down and watch a vintage black-and-white television seems as if you are doing something special. >> john is not alone, 13,000 people in britain are tuning in. >> in britain you must pay a television tax. a black-and-white television like this, you would have a license that would cost $78, as opposed to hundred $30 for color. >> some of these sets in south london date back to 1936. there were only a handful, only the rich could afford them. which is dangerous. >> much of the early televisions did not
to the technology, modern technology. >> reporter: if their spiritual life is to be strenthened, egyptians must enter into a relationship with god, he says. but the country's new constitution may restrict their ability to do that. >> there is not religious freedom, but, of course, there are some restrictions, yes, especially for the building of the churches. >> reporter: do you think that's going to change? >> very slight change. very, very slight. not nearly the same. >> reporter: he refused to answer a question about shari'a, even though egypt's new constitution makes it the main source of law. he did discuss the kidnapping of young christian girls. many are forced to marry and convert to islam. >> this is very sensitive issue for us. and this has wounded our hearts. >> reporter: the pope says western human rights organizations can raise awareness and bring pressure, but the matter must be addressed by egyptians. suffering is nothing new to egyptian christians. they faced waves of persecution since the first century. more recently, nearly 100 coptic orthodox christians have been killed in egy
investments that we make. >> but you think that because of technology and that kind of thing, americans today have many more opportunities in some sense than they had before? >> that's right. if you take median income and that means we haven't had this big improvement. >> which hasn't changed in the last 25 years. >> that really understates what's happened. i mean, would you rather be a gay man 20 years ago, 50 years ago? in africa and gdp didn't go up, but life spans almost doubled. literacy went from 20% to 16%. we don't capture all the wonderful things. i can use wikipedia for free and i can sit there with my son and explore new things. and, so, innovation is being underestimated today more than any time in history. i mean, we had the internet bubble where it was actually briefly overestimated. that was kind of uncomfortable, i think, but it's strange to be in such a funk because people look at political road block and some of the way that these measure things and they're not getting a sense of progress in the rich world and in the developing world. >> but when you look at washington and y
with just two pills. good eye. >>> leading 1k3er789s on science and technology warned of did devastating effects on economy and education if budget cuts go into effect on march. the sequester, among those testifying, shirley ann jackson, and joins me now.the sequester, testifying, shirley ann jackson, and joins me now.into effect on. the sequester, among those testifying, shirley ann jackson, and joins me now. welcome. you're no stranker to washington. born and raised here and former head of the nuclear regulatory commission. what are your big concerns about science and technology and the effects of the sequester if it goes in to effect? >> the big concerns are these. science and technology and the basic research that under girds it have been the the basis of over 50% of our gdp growth for 50 years. but the things we take for granted today are based on research that occurred over a 10, 20, 30 year period, even 50 years. and so one has to understand the source of idea generation. secondly, one has to have human talent. and that stall letalent is supp fellowships that come out of federal s
, information technology, even in accounting and finance. my frequent visits to employers across the state affirmed these reports. our state needs a way to accurately measure employment on a real-time basis. we need a better way to quickly measure trends and identify workforce needs by region, so we're working with members of the legislature to enact a system to help us connect workers to jobs in areas of great need from current and future employers. [applause] during the past year we partnered with the wisconsin covenant foundation to provide grants to technical colleges, employers in various regions, to improve workforce development. the next step will come in the state budget as we align new resources with our critcall needs in the workplace of the just a few days ago we graduated the first class under the wisconsin workforce partnership program. diane joined the program because she was unemployed after having been laid off and was looking for a new career. diane has already been hired by a corporation in new holstein as a c and c operator. she started work literally yesterday. diane is
robotics and mobile technology, verizon innovators have made it possible for teachers to teach, and for a kid... nathan. tadpole. ... to feel like a kid again. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. [ male announcer ] when you wear dentures you may not know it, but your mouth is under attack. food particles infiltrate and bacteria proliferate. ♪ protect your mouth, with fixodent. the adhesive helps create a food seal defense for a clean mouth and kills bacteria for fresh breath. ♪ fixodent, and forget it. >> the impossible situation in syria getting worse by the hour after the airstrike on targets. regime of bashar assad in syria is warning of a surprise response to what it called israeli aggression. as you recall, the israeli warplanes on wednesday bombed targets just outside the capital city of damascus, syria. a u.s. official says it was a strike on a convoy that was headed for lib non, which they say could have been an attempted transfer weapons to hezbollah. group that the united states government consider aster
in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. twe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. living with moderate to semeans living with pain.is it could also mean living with joint damage. humira, adalimumab, can help treat more than just the pain. for many adults, humira is clinically proven to help relieve pain and stop further joint damage. humira can lower your abilitto fight infections, including tuberculosis. serious, sometimes fatal events, such as infections, lymphoma, or other types of cancer, have happened. blood, liver and n
technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. >> my next guest talking about giving everybody a equal shot of the american dream . want to keep black people dependent on the government. welcome back larry elder. good to have you here. point black. are the policy. democratic party good for africa-american? >> the policies are not good for americans of any race. i had atfis smiley and cornel west . i informed them under ronald reagan, black adult unemployment fem faster . hispanic unemployment fell faster than white . latino fell white unemployment and both of them said i was wrong. tavis promised to g
yourself and the american public wants to be able, semi-automatic technology has been around for 100 years. if you limit the american public's access to semi-automatic technology, you limit their ability to survive. if someone is invading your house, you should not say you should only have five or six shots you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, not what some politician thinks is "reasonable." >>chris: a couple of weeks ago the n.r.a. started running an ad that create as great deal of controversy. here is a clip. >> are the president's kids more important than years? why is high skeptical about putting armed security in our schools? his kids are protected by our tax money. >>chris: do you regret putting up that ad? >> it wasn't picking on the president's kids. the president's kids are safe and we are. >> thankful for it. the point --. >>chris: they face a threat that most children do not face. >>guest: tell that to the people in newtown. >>chris: do you think the president's children are the same kind of target as every schoolchild in america? that is ridiculous and you know
... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. sharble data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. to tell real people about our new 15 under $15 menu! oh my goodness... oh my gosh, this looks amazing... [ male announcer ] 15 entrees under $15! it's o new maine stays! seafood, chicken, and more! h! the tilapia with roast vegables. i'actually looking at the od grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. that pork chop was great. no more fast food friday's. we're going to go to red lobster... [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food different. d introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99! salad, sandwiches and more. ohw owe>> a 21st century threat has officials worried tonight. they are pointing the finger of blame squarely at one company in particular. katherine herridge tells us who that is. >> fox news learned the administration is renewing the illegal framewor
a couple times. forget all of this. it goes back to what i'm ma general says. the technology is that drones are already going to be able to fit in the palm of your hand. we will have our own drones. that means for women it is like a little drone dog in your purse. a mysterious guise coming at you. drones will be robot pets. >> i'm telling you. >> i will see your drones for girls and use the drones drones for predators. i can use them to follow imogen home and she doesn't see it happen and disrobing happens on my lab -- lap p to. >> a camera drone is a peeper. >> i kind of reserve judgment on him, but i question that he does not have control of his client. we as lawyers have to tell our clients no, and he will sell whatever obama wants him to say. >> it is ideology. that's what it is. he is run by ideology and not by spying. >> is that what you call it? >> to assume we give this foot hold to this government and to assume it is going to be limited to this vague thing like you said in 10 years we will have drones all over the place. >> romney might do better? he is making up a document for dro
actually do need to study this, because our technology seems to be getting ahead of our morals. >> i don't know about our morals. but certainly ahead of our laws. the technology is advancing so fast, actually the thing you can claim the most credit for is your smart phone. the fact we are spending billions of dollars on these phones means batteries are getting smaller and processing is getting better. that technology can be used in all kinds of places. >> when you look at the notion of bringing these drones back into sort of civilian applications, it sounds sinister off the bat. but there are remarkable applications that are very beneficial to everyone, when it comes to drones in the united states. >> there are. my favorite kind of benign example is let's pretend for a second you and i own a golf course. we feel guilty, because we dump millions of gallons of water on the grass to keep it green. we know we are wasting some of it, because some places don't need water. if we had a small uav that could measure how much water was on the ground we could water more efficiently. that water would
in chicago it would cut crime but the basic right is to protect yourself and the -- semi-automatic technology has been around 100 years and if you limit the american public's access to semi-automatic technology, you limit their ability to survive. if someone is invading your house, i mean, you shouldn't say you should only have five or six shots, you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, a woman should, not what a politician thinks is reasonable. >> chris: a couple of weeks ago the nra started running an ad that created a great deal of controversy. here's a clip: >> are the president's kids more important than yours? why is he skeptical about putting armed security in our schools when his kids are protected by armed guards at their school? >> chris: mr. lapierre, do you regret putting up that ad? >> the point of ad was this, not -- >> you mentioned the president's kids. >> they are safe and we are thankful for it. the point -- >> they face a threat most children do not face. >> tell that to people in newtown -- >> do you really think the president's children are the same kind of ta
now where technology is kind of moving ahead of some of the cultural norms that have been seat. there was the 40-hour workweek for the longest time -- megyn: boy -- melissa: boy, when was that? [laughter] >> exactly. the american dream, huh? people would go home and have their leisure time, and now with smartphones and blackberries, you know, that's completely, um, that's really not the reality for a lot of americans. melissa: do they have a case? >> according to the suit, police brass pressured subordinates in the department's organized crime bureau to answer work-related calls and e-mails on their blackberries, and then they dissuaded the officers from filing for overtime. and then the cops are saying, whoa. and the only way you could be promoted was by -- melissa: are you doubting that? i mean, have you -- >> oh, no, i'm not doubting at all. melissa: you go in to work the next day, and they go didn't you get my e-mail? >> but that is how we succeed in america. basically, it's on a merit-based system. so, yeah, the detective that does go the extra yard, he gets them a sausage
, and the american public wants to be able. semi automatic technology has been around for a hundred years. if you limit the american public's access to semi automatic technology, you limit their ability to survive. if someone's invading your house, i mean, you shouldn't say you should only have five or six shots. you ought to have what you need to protect yourself, a woman should, not what some politician thinks is reasonable. >> gabby and i are both gun owners. i don't think you'll find a stronger supporter of the second amendment than me. i defended the secretary amendment of -- the sake amendment with my life. this isn't about the second amendment. this is about public safety. we had 20 first graders die in their classrooms because we don't have sufficient gun violence legislation in this country. >> joining us now is the anchor of "fox news sunday", chris wallace. good morning, chris. >> good morning to you. >> eric: it's interesting that mark kelly would say this isn't about the second amendment any more because that's, of course, the argument of those who support that and support gun rights
company to develop technology that would better detect concussions. joining us now to talk a little little more about it, dr. marti mack carry, professor of public health at john hopkins medical center, and the author of, unaccountable. general electric makes a lot of high-tech medical machines, ct scanners and the like. they would seem to be a natural partner for the league in trying to come up with more information about concussions and how often they happen. >> that's right, jon. they are a sort of likely partner. they also do a lot of research on plastics. part of this contract from the nfl to ge, which is about $50 million, will develop safer, helmets, better technology, better padding, better equipment. the other part will probably develop better scanners. you know ge makes a lot of the cat scanners and mri machines we use here in the hospital. so maybe better imaging can tell us more about the early signs of concussions. jon: some of the players have expressed concerns it is not even the major hits, the major concussion-inducing hits that are the south of what seem to be the problem
to produce carbon-producing technologies in the future. we are giving away our future. the president said future generations will look at the whole question as a moral one. we cannot ignore tha problem as serious as this. we have had cataclysmic storms and hurricanes and drought and fires. congress has spent billions and billions of dollars to try to help the areas that have become victims. what we have seen is a small example of what we will see. if we go forward, it will not eliminate problem. it will still take a lot to mitigate a lot of the damage because of the excess cause of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. >> louisiana, a republican column. >> congressman. i hope you will give me a minute or two to reel off a couple of facts about global warming. we have had 16 years with no warning whatsoever. sandy was not a hurricane when it made landfall. the drought reporter said the drop was less likely climate change. in great britain, a report was released law when warming predictions. james, a member, he just recently lowered his expectations. i would hope the facts will come out. more
spend less time... yea, the golden barrels... managing wireless costs and technology and more time driving your business potential. looks like we're going to need to order more agaves... ah! oh! ow! ... and more bandages. that's powerful. shareable data plus unlimited talk and text. now save $50 on a droid razr maxx hd by motorola. has oats that can help lower cholesterol? and it tastes good? sure does! ♪ wow. [ buzz ] delicious, right? yeah. it's the honey, it makes it taste so... ♪ well, would you look at the time... what's the rush? bee happy. bee healthy. with clusters of flakes and o's. oh, ho ho... it's the honey sweetness. i...i mean, you...love. but, dad, you've got... [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? hmm, we need a new game. ♪ that'll save the day. ♪ so will bounty select-a-size. it's the smaller powerful sheet. the only one with trap + lock technology. look! one select-a-size sheet of bounty is 50% more absorbent
a chance. ... feeling in the extremities ? no. technology can do that. who can tell me the third life cycle stage of the frog ? it can take a sick kid to school. nathan. tadpole. and help ensure a constant supply of clean energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger soluons. powerful answers. verizon. >> steve: super bowl is over. come on home, brian. >> brian: all right. sean did an unbelievable job. forgot to sleep. as did a.j. hall. >> gretchen: the clydesdales are here tomorrow. have a great day. plar there are new questions about the murder of the most effective navy seal sniper in history. chris kyle survived four tours of duty in iraq. but police say in the end he was killed this weekend by a marine veteran he was ready to help. gregg: kyle had 160 kills. the terrorists dubbed him the terror of ramadi and put a bounty on his head. martha: he was acting as a mentor to this man eddy ray ralph before police say ralph turned the gun on him and killed him. casey, what's the latest on the investigation here? >> reporter: this is a bi
absorb carbon out of the atmosphere. it's not a bad idea to find ute what technological applications to solve the carbon crisis that we're facing. but unfortunately a lot of the science is still in early stages and may have additional side effects that we don't fully understand yet. >> what are side effects? this is changing the bottom of the ocean, right? >> conceivably, what would happen is the phytoplankton at the surface would grow, according to minerals and iron that we seed the ocean with. and those would absorb it, being a plant those would absorb in decay absorb carbon, oxygen, and see sequester carbon out of the air. we don't know all of the potential impacts that they can have for food chains, also algae blooms toxic to animals as well as humans. early days of understanding what the long-term ramifications of the geoengineering would be. >> the ocean acidification. where are we going to go when our oceans die? when those oceans die, if they do, that's, to me, more important than the land being dry or getting more rain because of global warming climate change. we have to do
, new technology, by outsourcing. we have a structural problem in the economy here. david, who is to blame here? it's a complicated thing. i know it's not one person, probably. there is enormous amount of downward pressure at the same time, especially on those job creators and small business. and the ones that i interview in my radio show, these people aren't political people. laura, we are getting crushed here. >> yeah. not only our tax rate but getting crushed on these new obama care regulations. we have to put back people's hours. we love these people. these are community people. these are families, our friends. but we're barely making ends meet. we have to make a payroll. so the idea this is the big pollute craft, raping the poor people that narrative is really tired. >> it's not the big polutocrat it's the structure of modern capitalism. in the bush years when we did have strong employment growth a lot of jobs being created was low rate jobs. >> laura: globalization. >> also in the retail sector, the biggest area of job growth last month was retail jobs a lot of those reta
but not least, the use of technology. we have the ability to share information with technology that we have today with our computers and internet, having databases where we can share information with doctors and hospitals. again, keep the cost down and make sure that the consumer has good information, thorough information and make the choice. this empowers the consumer, which is i think what we all probably appreciate. and, frankly, at the end of the day i trust the consumer to make the decisions that are in the best interest of them. we have too much of a government mentality that thinks well, we know best. we need to choose for you. because you may make the wrong decision. and i think that's just wrongheaded. so let me just conclude this part by saying that what i'm talking about in utah here is a way of addressing this reform. it may not be the way. other states have different demographics. we have a young population in utah, we're the youngest of in america. our meeting age is only 29.2 here's a picture i'm the oldest guy in utah. [laughter] but if you compare our demographics to, say o
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 247 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)